Legislation

Current California Legislation

Assembly Bills:


AB 2
(Obernolte R) Hate crimes: peace officers.
Support Status: 3/14/2017-In committee: Set, second hearing. Failed passage. In committee: Reconsideration granted.
Location: 1/19/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Existing law prohibits committing a battery upon another person. Violation of this prohibition is punishable as a misdemeanor or felony, depending on the extent of injury. Under existing law, there is a penalty enhancement for a battery committed against a peace officer who is engaged in the performance of his or her duties. This bill would make any criminal act, except the crime of resisting, delaying, or obstructing an officer, committed in whole or in part because of the victim’s status as a peace officer, as defined, a hate crime.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 6
(Lackey R) Driving under the influence: drugged driving task force.

Support Status: 3/6/2017-Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
Location: 1/19/2017-A. APPR.
Summary: Existing law specifies the duties and powers of the Commissioner of the California Highway Patrol.This bill would require the commissioner to appoint, and serve as the chairperson of, a drugged driving task force, with specified membership, to develop recommendations for best practices, protocols, proposed legislation, and other policies that will address the issue of driving under the influence of drugs, including prescription drugs. The bill would also require the task force to examine the use of technology, including field testing technologies, to identify drivers under the influence of drugs. The bill would require the task force to report to the Legislature its policy recommendations and the steps that state agencies are taking regarding drugged driving.

AB 7
(Gipson D) Firearms: open carry.
Watch Status: 2/28/2017-Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 2/23/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/21/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law prohibits, with certain exceptions, openly carrying an unloaded handgun outside a vehicle while in or upon a public place or public street of an incorporated city or city and county or while in or upon a public place or public street within a prohibited area, being defined as any area in which it is unlawful to discharge a firearm. Existing law also prohibits, with certain exceptions, carrying an unloaded firearm that is not a handgun, such as a shotgun or rifle, while in an incorporated city or city and county but does not prohibit the carrying of an unloaded firearm other than a handgun in unincorporated areas of a county.This bill would prohibit the carrying of, and make it a crime to carry, an unloaded firearm other than a handgun while in or upon a public place or public street within a prohibited area located within the unincorporated area of a county.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

AB 16
(Cooper D) Criminal law: DNA evidence.

Support Status: 1/19/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 1/19/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Existing law, as amended by the DNA Fingerprint, Unsolved Crime and Innocence Protection Act, Proposition 69, approved by votes at the November 2, 2004, general election requires a person who has been convicted of a felony offense to provide buccal swab samples, right thumbprints, and a full palm print impression of each hand, and any blood specimens or other biological samples required for law enforcement identification analysis. Existing law imposes these requirements regardless of when the crime charged or committed became a qualifying offense.This bill would expand these provisions to require persons convicted of specified misdemeanors to provide buccal swab samples, right thumbprints, and a full palm print impression of each hand, and any blood specimens or other biological samples required for law enforcement identification analysis. By imposing additional duties on local law enforcement agencies to collect and forward these samples, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 27
(Melendez R) Violent felonies: sex offenses.
Support Status: 3/14/2017-VOTE: Do pass as amended and be re-referred to the Committee on [Appropriations]
Location: 3/14/2017-A. APPR.
Summary: Existing law, as amended by Proposition 21 as approved by the voters at the March 7, 2000, statewide primary election and by Proposition 83 at the November 7, 2006, statewide general election, classifies certain felonies as violent felonies for purposes of various provisions of the Penal Code. Existing law imposes an additional one-year term for a felony and a 3-year term for a violent felony for each prior separate prison term served for a violent felony. Existing law, as added by Proposition 184, adopted November 8, 1994, and amended by Proposition 36, adopted November 6, 2012, commonly known as the Three Strikes Law, also imposes additional years of imprisonment in state prison on a person who commits a violent felony and has been convicted of, or who has a prior conviction for, a violent felony. The Legislature may amend the above-specified initiative statutes by a statute passed in each house by a 2/3 vote. This bill would additionally define as violent felonies rape, sodomy, penetration with a foreign object, or oral copulation, if the victim was unconscious, if the victim was incapable of giving consent due to intoxication, if the victim was incapable of giving legal consent because of a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability, if the victim submitted to the act under the belief that the person committing the act was someone known to the victim other than the accused, or if the act was accomplished against the victim’s will by threatening to use the authority of a public official, thereby amending Proposition 36 by adding to the list of violent felonies that can be prosecuted as a 3rd strike. By changing the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 67
(Rodriguez D) Violent and nonviolent felonies.
Support Status: 3/14/2017-VOTE: Do pass as amended and be re-referred to the Committee on [Appropriations]
Location: 3/14/2017-A. APPR.
Summary: Existing law, as amended by Proposition 21 as approved by the voters at the March 7, 2000, statewide primary election and by Proposition 83 at the November 7, 2006, statewide general election, classifies certain felonies as violent felonies for purposes of various sentencing schemes. Existing law imposes an additional one-year term for a felony and a 3-year term for a violent felony for each prior separate prison term served for a violent felony. The Legislature may amend the above-specified initiative statutes by a statute passed in each house by a2/3 vote.This bill would additionally define as violent felonies human trafficking, domestic violence involving strangulation, sodomy or oral copulation if the victim was unconscious, and rape if the victim was unconscious, if the victim was incapable of giving consent due to intoxication, if the victim was incapable of giving legal consent because of a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability, if the victim submitted to the act under the belief that the person committing the act was someone known to the victim other than the accused, or if the act was accomplished against the victim’s will by threatening to use the authority of a public official. By changing the sentence of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

AB 76
(Chau D) Adult-use marijuana: marketing.
Watch Status: 1/5/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee February 4.
Location: 1/4/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law, the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), enacted by the voters at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, regulates the cultivation, distribution, and use of marijuana for nonmedical purposes by people 21 years of age and older. Existing law, except if for medical purposes, makes it illegal for a person under 21 years of age to possess or use marijuana and for a person to sell or transfer marijuana to a person under 21 years of age. This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to introduce legislation relating to the prohibition of the marketing of adult-use marijuana to children.

AB 78
(Cooper D) Vessels: operation and equipment: blue lights.
Support Status: 3/14/2017-Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
Location: 1/19/2017-A. APPR.
Summary: Existing law reserves the use of a distinctive blue light to law enforcement vessels. Existing law authorizes the blue light to be displayed during the day or night when the vessel is engaged in direct law enforcement activities as specified. Existing law prohibits the display of this blue light on vessels for other purposes. Existing law requires vessels approaching, overtaking, being approached, or being overtaken by a moving law enforcement vessel operating with a siren or an illuminated blue light to immediately slow to a speed sufficient to maintain steerage, alter course so as not to inhibit or interfere with the operation of the law enforcement vessel, and proceed at the reduced speed unless directed otherwise. Existing law requires the operator of a cable ferry to take whatever reasonable action is necessary to provide a clear course for a law enforcement vessel operating with a siren or an illuminated blue light. Existing law makes the violation of these provisions an infraction, punishable by a fine.This bill would reserve the use of this distinctive blue light to public safety vessels, defined to include law enforcement, fire department, or fire protection district vessels, that are engaged in direct law enforcement activities, or public safety activities conducted by a fire department or fire protection district, as provided. By expanding the law to cover fire department and fire protection district vessels, the bill would expand the scope of a crime, thereby creating a state-mandated local program.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 90
(Weber D) Criminal gangs.
Watch Status: 3/13/2017-Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/9/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Existing law, the California Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act (act), provides specified punishments for certain crimes committed for the benefit of, at the direction of, or in association with, a criminal street gang, as specified. There is established within the Department of Justice the CalGang Executive Board, which is responsible for the administration, policy, and sustainability of the CalGang system, a shared gang database of statewide gang-related information. The act defines a “shared gang database” as having various attributes, including, among others, that the database contains personal, identifying information in which a person may be designated as a suspected gang member, associate, or affiliate, or for which entry of a person in the database reflects a designation of that person as a suspected gang member, associate, or affiliate.This bill would make the Department of Justice responsible for administering and overseeing any shared gang database in which California law enforcement agencies participate, and would provide that commencing January 1, 2018, the CalGang Executive Board would no longer administer or oversee the CalGang database or the shared gang databases that participate in the CalGang database. The bill would require the department to promulgate regulations governing the use, operation, and oversight of any shared gang database, including, among other things, establishing the requirements for entering and reviewing gang designations, the retention period for listed gangs, the criteria for identifying gang members, and the definitions of offenses consistent with gang activity. The bill would require the department to establish a technical advisory committee with specified members to advise on uses of shared gang databases. The bill would require the department to develop and implement standardized periodic training for all users authorized to enter data in a shared gang database, as well as for all users authorized to access data in a shared gang database. The bill would require the department to promulgate regulations to provide for periodic audits by law enforcement agencies and department staff to ensure the accuracy, reliability, and proper use of any shared gang database, and to report the results of those audits to the public. The bill would impose a moratorium on the use of the CalGang database commencing January 1, 2018, until, among other requirements, the Attorney General certifies that standardized periodic training and periodic audit regulation requirements have been met. The bill would require the department to oversee removal of all data related to a person designated as a suspected gang member, associate, or affiliate in a shared gang database if no new records indicating gang membership have been entered during the previous 2 years. The bill would state findings and declarations of the Legislature regarding shared gang databases.

AB 158
(Chu D) Hate crime reporting standards.
Watch Status: 1/13/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee February 12.
Location: 1/12/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law establishes the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training and requires the commission to establish minimum training standards for specified law enforcement officers. Existing law requires the commission to develop guidelines and a course of instruction and training for law enforcement officers addressing hate crimes. Existing law requires the course to include instruction in reporting and documenting hate crimes, as defined.This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation establishing uniform hate crime reporting standards for law enforcement agencies statewide.

AB 163
(Weber D) School safety: peace officer interactions with pupils.
Oppose Status: 1/30/2017-Referred to Coms. on ED. and PUB. S.
Location: 1/30/2017-A. ED.
Summary: Existing law requires school districts and county offices of education to be responsible for the overall development of comprehensive school safety plans for its schools operating kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 12, inclusive. Existing law authorizes the governing board of a school district to establish a school police department under the supervision of a school chief of police and to employ peace officers. This bill would require the governing board of a school district to adopt and annually review a policy regarding the scope of peace officer interactions, including, but not limited to, those employed by a school police department or by a local law enforcement agency, with pupils and to consider how to reduce the presence of peace officers on campus. By imposing additional duties on school districts, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require a school district, before the beginning of the 2018–19 school year, as a condition of having a school police department to adopt specified policies, or as a condition of entering into or continuing an agreement with a local law enforcement agency to have one or more regularly assigned peace officers at any of its schools to enter into a memorandum of understanding containing specified policies, regarding the scope of peace officer interactions with pupils. The bill would require those policies to include specified elements, including, among others, that school staff only call a peace officer when there is a real and immediate physical threat to pupils, teachers, or public safety or when mandated by existing law, that a peace officer not arrest or discipline pupils for violations of school rules or for low-level misconduct, and that a peace officer not interview or arrest a pupil on a school campus during school hours absent a real and immediate physical threat to pupils, teachers, or public safety.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 173
(Jones-Sawyer D) School safety: peace officer interactions with pupils.
Oppose Status: 1/30/2017-Referred to Coms. on ED. and PUB. S.
Location: 1/30/2017-A. ED.
Calendar: 4/5/2017 1:30 p.m. – State Capitol, Room 4202 ASSEMBLY EDUCATION, O’DONNELL, Chair
Summary: Existing law, the Interagency School Safety Demonstration Act of 1985, requires school districts and county offices of education to be responsible for the overall development of comprehensive school safety plans for its schools operating kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 12, inclusive. The act establishes the School/Law Enforcement Partnership, comprised of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Attorney General, whose duties include, among others, the development of programs and policies necessary to implement the provisions of the Education Code relating to school safety plans. This bill would require the governing board of a school district to adopt policies mandating proper protection of pupils’ rights in interactions with peace officers, including, but not limited to, that school staff not call a peace officer to arrest, discipline, or otherwise interact with a pupil for a violation of school rules and that school staff exhaust all alternatives before involving a peace officer for low-level misconduct. The bill would require a school district to collect and publicly report comprehensive data regarding peace officer interactions with pupils and to have a procedure through which pupils and community members can complain about misconduct relating to peace officer interactions with pupils. By imposing additional duties on school districts, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 175
(Chau D) Adult-use marijuana: marketing: packaging and labeling.
Support Status: 1/18/2017-From printer.
Location: 1/17/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law, the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), enacted by the voters at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, regulates the cultivation, distribution, and use of marijuana for nonmedical purposes by people 21 years of age and older. Under existing law, the Bureau of Marijuana Control is responsible for licensing and regulating retail sales, distribution, and transportation, and the State Department of Public Health is responsible for licensing and regulating manufacturers. AUMA places restrictions on the packaging and labeling of marijuana and marijuana products, including that the packaging be resealable, child resistant, and not made attractive to children.This bill would require a manufacturer, prior to introducing an edible marijuana product into commerce in California, to submit the packaging and labeling to the bureau for approval and would require the bureau to determine whether the packaging and labeling are in compliance with the requirements of prescribed provisions of AUMA, including the requirements that the packaging be child resistant and not attractive to children, as specified. The bill would authorize the bureau to charge a manufacturer a fee for the determination, in an amount no greater than the amount required to cover the actual and reasonable costs of administering the approval program.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 197
(Kiley R) Violent felonies.
Support Status: 1/30/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 1/30/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/21/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law, as amended by Proposition 21 as approved by the voters at the March 7, 2000, statewide primary election and by Proposition 83 of the November 7, 2006, statewide general election, classifies certain felonies as violent felonies for purposes of various provisions of the Penal Code. Existing law imposes an additional one-year term for a felony and a 3-year term for a violent felony for each prior separate prison term served for a violent felony. Existing law, as added by Proposition 184, adopted November 8, 1994, and amended by Proposition 36, adopted November 6, 2012, commonly known as the Three Strikes Law, also imposes additional years of imprisonment in state prison on a person who commits a violent felony and has been convicted of, or who has a prior conviction for, a violent felony. The Legislature may amend the above-specified initiative statutes by a statute passed in each house by a 2/3 vote. This bill would additionally define as violent felonies child abduction, providing a child under 16 years of age for purposes of a lewd act, abduction of a minor for purposes of prostitution, child abuse, sodomy with a minor, oral copulation of a minor, contact with a minor to commit specified offenses, arranging a meeting with a minor for lewd purposes, employing a minor to produce sexual matter, elder and dependent adult abuse, false imprisonment of an elder or dependent adult, and animal abuse, as specified, thereby amending Proposition 36 by adding to the list of violent felonies that can be prosecuted as a 3rd strike. By changing the definition of a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

AB 255
(Gallagher R) Sexually violent predators: out-of-county placement.
Support Status: 3/14/2017-VOTE: Do pass as amended, and be re-referred to the Committee on [Appropriations] with recommendation: To Consent Calendar
Location: 3/14/2017-A. APPR.
Summary: Existing law generally requires a sexually violent predator who is conditionally released to be placed in the county that was the person’s county of domicile prior to the person’s incarceration. Existing law provides for placement outside of the county of domicile if specified circumstances exist. Existing law specifies certain information to be considered in determining the county of domicile, and provides that if that information cannot be identified or verified, that the county of domicile is the county in which the person was arrested for the crime for which he or she was last incarcerated in the state prison or from which he or she was last returned from parole.This bill would require the court to consider additional factors when determining the county of placement that is not the county of domicile. The bill would also provide that if consideration of those factors does not identify a suitable county for conditional release that is not the county of domicile, the county of conditional release is the county in which the person was arrested for the crime for which he or she was last incarcerated in the state prison or from which he or she was last returned from parole.

AB 282
(Jones-Sawyer D) Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training: procedural justice training.
Watch Status: 2/13/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 2/13/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Existing law establishes the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training and requires it to develop and disseminate guidelines and training for law enforcement officers, as described.This bill would require the commission to develop and disseminate training for peace officers on principled policing, which would include the subjects of procedural justice and implicit bias, as defined. The bill would require this training for specified peace officers. The bill would also require the commission to certify and make training available to train peace officers to teach the course of training on principled policing to other officers in their agencies. The bill would require the commission to offer the principled policing course and the training course quarterly commencing in June 2018. The bill would require the commission, no later than June 1, 2019, to evaluate its current course of basic training and promulgate a plan to incorporate the concepts of principled policing into its course of basic training and would require each peace officer to complete a refresher course no less than every 5 years.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 284
(McCarty D) Peace officers: use of force.

Oppose Status: 2/3/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 5.
Location: 2/2/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law authorizes a peace officer who has reasonable cause to believe that a person to be arrested has committed a public offense to use reasonable force to effect the arrest, to prevent escape, or to overcome resistance.This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that increases public trust and transparency in an incident involving a peace officer-involved shooting or other uses of force by a peace officer resulting in the death of a civilian.This bill contains other existing laws.

AB 283
(Cooper D) County employees’ retirement: permanent incapacity.
Support Status: 2/3/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 5.
Location: 2/2/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: The County Employees Retirement Law of 1937 provides that a member who is permanently incapacitated shall be retired for disability despite age if, among other conditions, the member’s incapacity is a result of injury or disease arising out of and in the course of the member’s employment, and that employment contributes substantially to that incapacity or the member has completed 5 years of service and not waived retirement in respect to the particular incapacity or aggravation thereof, as specified.This bill would specify that any member who is classified as a peace officer, as defined, shall be retired for disability upon meeting the criteria of this provision, regardless of the member’s rank, position, or duty at the time of injury or at the time of application for permanent incapacity. The bill would also make nonsubstantive changes to that provision.

AB 298
(Gallagher R) Immigration holds.
Watch Status: 2/13/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 2/13/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/21/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: (1)Existing state law provides that a law enforcement official has discretion to cooperate with federal immigration officials by detaining an individual on the basis of an immigration hold after the person becomes eligible for release only if continued detention of the individual on the basis of the hold does not violate federal, state, or local law, or any local policy, and the person has been convicted of certain crimes.This bill would require a local law enforcement official to cooperate with federal immigration officials by detaining an individual convicted of a felony on the basis of an immigration hold for up to 48 hours, as specified, after the person becomes eligible for release from custody if continued detention on the basis of the immigration hold would not violate federal law. By creating new duties for local officials, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would also make conforming changes.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 320
(Cooley D) Children’s advocacy centers.
Support Status: 2/21/2017-Referred to Coms. on PUB. S. and HUM. S.
Location: 2/21/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Existing law states the intent of the Legislature that the law enforcement agencies and the county welfare or probation department of each county develop and implement cooperative arrangements in order to coordinate existing duties in connection with the investigation of suspected child abuse or neglect cases. Existing law requires a local law enforcement agency having jurisdiction over a reported case of child abuse to report to the county welfare or probation department that it is investigating the case, and requires the county welfare department or probation department, in certain cases, to evaluate what action or actions would be in the best interest of the child and to submit its findings to the district attorney, as specified.This bill would authorize a county to initiate a formal interagency protocol agreement to create multidisciplinary teams in order to implement a coordinated multidisciplinary response to intervention in reports involving child physical or sexual abuse, exploitation, or maltreatment. The bill would require a county that initiates an interagency protocol agreement to include as members of the multidisciplinary team representatives from the district attorney’s office, local city and county law enforcement agencies, and the child protective services agency, and would require the interagency protocol agreement to be signed by all members of the multidisciplinary team. The bill would require that representatives of the multidisciplinary team work together at a children’s advocacy center to conduct interviews and make informed decisions about the investigation, treatment, management, and prosecution of child abuse cases and to provide culturally competent services or referrals and would authorize multidisciplinary team members to share with each other information in their possession concerning the child, the family of the child, and the person who is the subject of the abuse or neglect investigation, as specified. The bill would provide that a member of a multidisciplinary team and a child forensic interviewer or other provider of a children’s advocacy center shall not be civilly or criminally liable for providing services to children or nonoffending family members.

AB 324
(Kiley R) Crimes: disorderly conduct.
Support Status: 3/14/2017-VOTE: Do pass as amended and be re-referred to the Committee on [Appropriations]
Location: 3/14/2017-A. APPR.
Summary: Existing law provides that a person who uses a camera or similar device to photograph, film, or otherwise record an identifiable person under or through their clothing, for the purpose of viewing their body or undergarments for the purpose of sexual gratification, or to record an identifiable person who is in a state of full or partial undress in an area in which they have a reasonable expectation of privacy, without their consent, is guilty of disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor.This bill would eliminate the requirement that the recorded person in either of these circumstances be identifiable.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 359
(Jones-Sawyer D) In-custody informants.
Watch Status: 3/16/2017-From committee chair, with author’s amendments: Amend, and re-refer to Com. on PUB. S. Read second time and amended.
Location: 2/21/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/21/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law defines an in-custody informant to mean a person, other than a codefendant, percipient witness, accomplice, or coconspirator whose testimony is based upon statements made by the defendant while both the defendant and the informant are held within a correctional institution. Existing law prohibits a law enforcement or correctional official from giving, offering, or promising to give any monetary payment in excess of $50 in return for an in-custody informant’s testimony in any criminal proceeding, as specified. Existing law requires the prosecution to file with the court a written statement prior to trial setting out any and all consideration, as defined, promised to, or received by, the in-custody informant when the prosecution calls an in-custody informant as a witness in any criminal trial.This bill would revise the definition of an in-custody informant to refer to a person, other than a codefendant, percipient witness, accomplice, or coconspirator who provides testimony or information for use in the investigation or prosecution of a suspect or defendant based upon statements made by the suspect or defendant while both the suspect or defendant and the informant are housed within a correctional institution. The bill would require the prosecutor, when the prosecution intends to call an in-custody informant as a witness in any criminal trial, to file with the court a written statement no less than 30 days prior to the preliminary hearing setting out the substance of all communications between the informant and any member of the prosecution, or a law enforcement or correctional agency, regarding the informant’s possible testimony or participation in information gathering, and setting out any and all consideration impliedly or expressly offered or promised to, or requested or received by, the in-custody informant. The bill would require the statement to contain specified information, including the informant’s complete criminal history, including pending criminal charges or investigations in which the informant is a suspect, and whether the informant is a substance abuser or has a history of substance abuse. The bill would also revise the definition of consideration for purposes of these provisions.This bill contains other related provisions.

AB 371
(Cooley D) Sex crimes: communication with a minor.
Support Status: 3/15/2017-From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 7. Noes 0.) (March 14). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
Location: 3/15/2017-A. APPR.
Summary: Existing law, as added by Proposition 83 of the November 7, 2006, statewide general election, makes it a crime for a person to contact or communicate with a minor, or attempt to contact or communicate with a minor, who knows or reasonably should know that the person is a minor, with intent to commit a specified offense involving the minor, including, among other offenses, kidnapping and rape.This bill would additionally make it a crime to contact or communicate with a minor, or attempt to contact or communicate with a minor, as specified, with the intent to commit human trafficking of the minor. By expanding the definition of a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 375
(Chau D) Public utilities: local publicly owned utilities: release of customer information.
Oppose Status: 3/9/2017-In committee: Hearing postponed by committee.
Location: 2/21/2017-A. P. & C.P.
Calendar: 3/28/2017 1:30 p.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PRIVACY AND CONSUMER PROTECTION, CHAU, Chair
Summary: (1)The California Public Records Act requires that public records, as defined, be open to inspection at all times during the hours of a state or local agency and that every person has a right to inspect any public record, with specified exceptions. Existing law prohibits the act from being construed to require the disclosure of certain information concerning utility customers of local agencies, but provides for the disclosure of some of that information, specifically the name, utility usage data, and home address of a utility customer, upon court order or the request of a law enforcement agency relative to an ongoing investigation.This bill would instead provide for the disclosure of that information to a law enforcement agency only in response to a warrant issued pursuant to specified criminal procedures.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 389
(Salas D) Marijuana: consumer guide.

Watch Status: 2/10/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 12.
Location: 2/9/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: The Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MCRSA) provides for the licensure and regulation of medical marijuana. The Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act of 2016 (AUMA), an initiative measure enacted by the approval of Proposition 64 at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, authorizes the consumption of nonmedical marijuana by persons over 21 years of age and provides for the licensure and regulation of certain commercial nonmedical marijuana activities. AUMA establishes the administrative and enforcement responsibilities of the Bureau of Marijuana, within the Department of Consumer Affairs, and the Director of Consumer Affairs with regard to both AUMA and MCRSA.This bill would require the bureau, by July 1, 2018, to establish and make available on its Internet Web site a consumer guide to educate the public on the regulation of medical and nonmedical marijuana.

AB 437
(Rodriguez D) Emergency services.
Watch Status: 2/14/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 16.
Location: 2/13/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law, the Warren-911-Emergency Act, provides for an emergency response system among city and county police and first responders to provide coordinated emergency services to persons in emergency situations.This bill would express the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that would modify emergency response systems to improve interactions between people with disabilities and law enforcement and other first responders.

AB 459
(Chau D) Public records: body-worn cameras.

Support Status: 2/27/2017-Referred to Coms. on P. & C.P. and JUD.
Location: 2/27/2017-A. P. & C.P.
Calendar: 3/28/2017 1:30 p.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PRIVACY AND CONSUMER PROTECTION, CHAU, Chair
Summary: Existing law, the California Public Records Act, requires state and local agencies to make their records available for public inspection, unless an exemption from disclosure applies.This bill would exempt video and audio files from a body-worn camera created by a peace officer of a state or local law enforcement agency that depict any victim of rape, incest, domestic violence, or child abuse from disclosure pursuant to the act, unless the victim or victims depicted provide express written consent.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 493
(Jones-Sawyer D) Crime: victims and witnesses: immigration violations.
Watch Status: 2/27/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 2/27/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/21/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law prohibits a peace officer from detaining an individual exclusively for any actual or suspected immigration violation or reporting or turning the individual over to federal immigration authorities whenever an individual who is a victim of or witness to a hate crime, as defined, or who otherwise can give evidence in a hate crime investigation, is not charged with or convicted of committing any crime under state law.This bill would enact a prohibition similar to the one described above that would be applicable whenever an individual is a victim of or witness to a crime, or otherwise can give evidence in a criminal investigation, without regard to whether the crime is a hate crime.

AB 530
(Cooper D) Local public employee labor relations.

Support Status: 2/14/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 16.
Location: 2/13/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law, the Meyers-Milias-Brown Act, authorizes local public employees, as defined, to form, join, and participate in the activities of employee organizations of their own choosing to represent themselves on matters of employer-employee relations. Existing law also grants these public employees the right to refuse to join or participate in those activities and to represent themselves individually in their employment relations. This bill would make nonsubstantive changes to these provisions.

AB 537
(Acosta R) Serious felonies.
Watch Status: 2/27/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 2/27/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/28/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law, as added by Proposition 8, adopted June 8, 1982, and amended by Proposition 21, adopted March 7, 2000, among other things, defines a serious felony. Existing law, also added by Proposition 8, adopted June 8, 1982, and amended by Proposition 36, adopted November 6, 2012, commonly known as the Three Strikes Law, requires increased penalties for certain recidivist offenders in addition to any other enhancement or penalty provisions that may apply, including individuals with current and prior convictions of a serious felony, as specified. Existing law, the Three Strikes Law, specifies that references to code sections contained in the law, including references to the definition of a serious felony, are to those statutes as they existed on November 7, 2012. The Legislature may directly amend Proposition 8 and Proposition 21 by a statute passed in each house by a 2/3 vote, or by a statute that becomes effective only when approved by the voters. The Legislature may directly amend Proposition 36 by a statute passed in each house by a 2/3 vote or by a statute that becomes effective when approved by a majority of the electors. This bill would amend those initiatives statutes by adding certain felonies, including threatening a witness and human trafficking, to the definition of a serious felony, as specified. The bill would specify that for all offenses committed on or after January 1, 2018, references to code sections contained in the Three Strikes Law are to those statutes as they read January 1, 2018. Because the bill would impose additional duties on local prosecutors, and because it would expand the punishments for existing crimes, it would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would make other technical, nonsubstantive changes.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 539
(Acosta R) Search warrants.
Watch Status: 2/27/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 2/27/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/28/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law provides that a search warrant may only be issued upon probable cause, supported by affidavit, naming or describing the person to be searched or searched for, and particularly describing the property, thing, or things and the place to be searched. Existing law also specifies the grounds upon which a search warrant may be issued.This bill would authorize a search warrant to be issued on the grounds that the property or things to be seized consist of evidence that tends to show that a violation of the above described crime of disorderly conduct has occurred or is occurring.This bill contains other existing laws.

AB 578
(Reyes D) Threatening a witness: threats to report immigration status.
Watch Status: 2/27/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 2/27/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/21/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law makes it a misdemeanor to knowingly and maliciously prevent or dissuade, or attempt to prevent or dissuade, a witness or victim from attending or giving testimony at a trial, proceeding, or inquiry authorized by law or to attempt to prevent or dissuade a victim or witness of a crime to report that crime to law enforcement or seek the arrest of a person in connection with that victimization. Existing law makes the same actions a felony, punishable by 2, 3, or 4 years, if specified additional criteria exist, including accompanying the act by force or by an express or implied threat of force or violence, upon a witness, victim, or any 3rd person or the property of a victim, witness, or any 3rd person.This bill would include in the list of circumstances that make threatening a witness or victim a felony a threat to report the immigration status or suspected immigration status of a crime victim or witness, or of a victim’s or witness’ family member or relative. By increasing the penalty for a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 585
(Gipson D) Public officers.
Watch Status: 2/27/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 2/27/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/28/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law provides that a sheriff’s or police security officer is a public officer whose duties are limited to the physical security of properties owned, operated, controlled, or administered by the county or city, or any municipality or special district contracting for police services from the county or city, and other necessary duties, as specified. Existing law provides that a sheriff’s or police security officer is not a peace officer and may not exercise the powers of arrest of a peace officer, but may issue citations for infractions and may carry or possess a firearm, baton, and other safety equipment and weapons authorized by the sheriff or police chief, as specified. Existing law requires each sheriff’s or police security officer to satisfactorily complete a specified course of training prior to being assigned to perform his or her duties.This bill would provide, for purposes of those provisions, that a police security officer includes an officer employed by a police division that is within a city department and that operates independently of the city police department commanded by the police chief of a city. By imposing additional training requirements for employees of local entities, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 608
(Irwin D) Electronic Communications Privacy Act.
Watch Status: 3/2/2017-Re-referred to Com. on P. & C.P.
Location: 2/27/2017-A. P. & C.P.
Calendar: 4/18/2017 1:30 p.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PRIVACY AND CONSUMER PROTECTION, CHAU, Chair
Summary: Existing law, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, prohibits a government entity from compelling the production of, or access to, electronic communication information or electronic device information, as defined, without a search warrant, wiretap order, order for electronic reader records, or subpoena issued pursuant to specified conditions.This bill would specify the manner in which unrelated information obtained pursuant to a warrant is to be sealed. This bill would specify that information obtained pursuant to these provisions may, as specified in the warrant, be returned to the person from which it was obtained instead of being destroyed. This bill would also clarify that the information may be retained, before being destroyed or returned, through the conclusion of any proceeding, including appellate proceedings.This bill contains other existing laws.

AB 662
(Choi R) Restitution: tracking.
Support Status: 3/2/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Existing law allows an agency designated by the board of supervisors in a county where an inmate is incarcerated to deduct 20% to 50% of the county jail equivalent of wages and trust account deposits of the inmate in order to satisfy his or her restitution order.This bill would, if the local plan includes victim restitution programs, require the restitution to be tracked by the sheriff’s department if the person owing restitution is incarcerated or the probation department if the person owing restitution is on supervised release. The bill would require the tracking program to include monthly notices, garnishment, and notice by a collections agency. The bill would also require quarterly statements to be sent to a victim to whom restitution is owed. The bill would authorize the county to use a portion of its Local Revenue Fund 2011 funds to manage the restitution program and to set up a tracking and collection program. By imposing new duties on local sheriff and probation departments, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 683
(Garcia, Eduardo D) Prisoners: support services.
Watch Status: 3/2/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/21/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law requires the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to contract with a private nonprofit agency or agencies to establish and operate a visitor center outside each state adult prison in California that has a population of more than 300 inmates. Under existing law, those visitor centers are required to provide minimum services to prison visitors, including, among other services, assistance with transportation between public transit terminals and prisons, child care for visitors’ children, and referral to other agencies and services.This bill would appropriate $1,500,000 from the General Fund to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation for allocation to the Counties of Alameda, Los Angeles, Monterey, Riverside, and Santa Clara to implement pilot programs in those counties to provide reentry services and support to persons who are, or who are scheduled to be, released from a county jail. The bill would require the pilot programs to include specified components, including support services for parents and a mentorship program. The bill would require each county that elects to implement one or more pilot programs pursuant to these provisions to conduct a study and submit to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2023, a report evaluating the effectiveness of the pilot programs in the county. The bill would also include a statement of legislative findings and declarations.

AB 693
(Irwin D) Firearms.
Watch Status: 3/16/2017-Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/21/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law generally requires that a firearms transaction be conducted through a licensed firearms dealer and prohibits the transfer of a firearm unless the person has been issued a firearms license. Existing law provides various exceptions to this requirement, including for firearms sold or transferred to an authorized law enforcement representative for use by the law enforcement agency.This bill would exempt the loan of a firearm from the requirement that the transaction be conducted through a dealer or by a dealer if the loan is made to a student enrolled in the course of basic training prescribed by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training, or any other course certified by the commission, for purposes of participation in the course.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 702
(Lackey R) Driving under the influence: chemical tests.
Support Status: 3/2/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: (1)When a person is convicted of violating specified driving-under-the-influence (DUI) provisions, and at the time of the arrest leading to that conviction the person willfully refused a peace officer’s request to submit to, or willfully failed to complete, a specified chemical test, existing law requires a court to impose additional penalties, as specified.This bill would increase, as specified, the additional penalties that a court is required to impose if the person convicted of violating specified DUI offenses who willfully refused to complete a breath test at the time of arrest has previously been convicted of specified DUI offenses. Because this bill would increase a person’s term in a county jail, as specified, if the person has previously been convicted of a specified DUI offense, it would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 704
(Grayson D) Multidisciplinary teams: human trafficking and domestic violence.
Support Status: 3/2/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/28/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law requires every law enforcement agency in the state to develop, adopt, and implement written policies and standards for officers’ responses to domestic violence. Existing law also authorizes counties to establish multidisciplinary personnel teams regarding issues like child abuse to allow various agencies to collaborate.This bill would authorize a county to establish a domestic violence multidisciplinary personnel team and a human trafficking multidisciplinary personnel team to allow agencies to share confidential information in order to investigate reports of suspected crimes. This bill would authorize members of those multidisciplinary personnel teams to disclose to one another information and records that are relevant to the prevention, identification, or treatment of those crimes.

AB 708
(Quirk-Silva D) Occupational safety and health.
Support Status: 3/2/2017-Referred to Com. on L. & E.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. L. & E.
Calendar: 3/29/2017 1:30 p.m. – State Capitol, Room 447 ASSEMBLY LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT, THURMOND, Chair
Summary: The California Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 requires a state, county, or local fire or police agency that is called to an accident involving an employee covered by the act in which a serious injury or illness, or death occurs to immediately notify the nearest office of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health by telephone. This bill would discontinue the requirement that the notification be made by telephone.

AB 729
(Gray D) Nonmedical marijuana: licensee regulation.
Watch Status: 2/16/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 18.
Location: 2/15/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: (1)Existing law, the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act, makes various acts involving marijuana a crime except as authorized by law. Existing law, the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), added by Proposition 64 at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, authorizes a person 21 years of age or older to possess and use specified amounts of marijuana. AUMA also authorizes a person who obtains a state license under AUMA to engage in commercial marijuana activity, which does not include commercial medical cannabis activity, pursuant to that license and applicable local ordinances. AUMA prohibits a licensee from engaging in specified nonmedical marijuana commercial activities with a person under 21 years of age. AUMA generally divides responsibility for the state licensure and regulation of commercial marijuana activity among the Bureau of Marijuana Control (bureau) within the Department of Consumer Affairs, the Department of Food and Agriculture, and the State Department of Public Health, and requires those state licensing authorities to begin issuing licenses by January 1, 2018. AUMA authorizes legislative amendment of its provisions with a 2/3 vote of both houses of the Legislature, to further its purposes and intent. AUMA also authorizes the Legislature by a majority vote to amend certain provisions of the act to implement specified substantive provisions, provided that the amendments are consistent with and further the purposes and intent of the act.This bill would require a licensing authority to suspend a license for a 3rd or subsequent violation of the prohibition on engaging in nonmedical marijuana commercial activities with a person under 21 years of age if the violation occurs within 36 months of the initial violation. The bill would authorize a licensing authority to revoke a license for a 3rd violation of that provision that occurs within any 36-month period. The bill would specify that these provisions do not limit the authority and discretion of a licensing authority to revoke a license prior to a 3rd violation when the circumstances warrant that penalty.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 823
(Chau D) Edible marijuana products: labeling.
Watch Status: 3/16/2017-Re-referred to Com. on P. & C.P.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. P. & C.P.
Summary: Existing law, the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), enacted by an initiative statute at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, regulates the cultivation, distribution, and use of marijuana for nonmedical purposes by people 21 years of age and older, including edible marijuana products. Existing law requires an edible marijuana product that is in solid form to be delineated or scored into standardized serving sizes if the marijuana product contains more than one serving. This bill would require each single serving of an edible marijuana product to be stamped, marked, or otherwise imprinted directly on the product with a universal symbol, to be designed by the Bureau of Marijuana Control. The bill would specify the required size and visibility of the universal symbol.This bill contains other existing laws.

AB 825
(Choi R) State employees’ retirement.
Watch Status: 2/17/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 19.
Location: 2/16/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law, for the purposes of complying with the federal Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990, requires the Department of Human Resources to develop and administer a retirement program in which state employees, as defined, who are not covered by social security or by the Public Employees’ Retirement System can defer compensation at 7.5% of wages, as specified.This bill would make nonsubstantive changes to that provision.

AB 833
(Allen, Travis R) Public employees’ retirement.
Watch Status: 2/17/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 19.
Location: 2/16/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law, the California Public Employees’ Pension Reform Act of 2013, establishes various limits on retirement benefits generally applicable to a public employee retirement system, except as specified, and among other things, prescribes limits on service after retirement without reinstatement into the applicable retirement system.This bill would make a nonsubstantive change to that provision.

AB 845
(Wood D) Cannabidiol.

Watch Status: 2/17/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 19.
Location: 2/16/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law, the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act, classifies controlled substances into 5 designated schedules, with the most restrictive limitations generally placed on controlled substances classified in Schedule I, and the least restrictive limitations generally placed on controlled substances classified in Schedule V. Existing law places marijuana in Schedule I. Cannabidiol is a compound found in marijuana.This bill would authorize, if federal law authorizes the prescription of a controlled substance containing cannabidiol, a physician to prescribe that substance in accordance with federal law. The bill would also provide that upon the enactment of federal law authorizing the prescription or the furnishing, transferring, possession, or use of a prescription for a controlled substance containing cannabidiol, notwithstanding any other state law, the prescription, furnishing, transferring, possession, or use of that controlled substance in accordance with federal law is for a legitimate medical purpose and is authorized pursuant to state law.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 887
(Cooper D) Public safety officers: investigations and interviews.

Support Status: 3/16/2017-From committee chair, with author’s amendments: Amend, and re-refer to Com. on PUB. S. Read second time and amended.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: (1)Existing law, the Public Safety Officers Procedural Bill of Rights Act, grants a variety of rights to public safety officers, as defined, and imposes various duties on their employers. The act requires, when a public safety officer is under investigation and is interrogated by his or her commanding officer, or another member of the employing agency, on matters than that could lead to punitive action, the interrogation be conducted under certain conditions, including that the public safety officer under investigation shall be informed of the nature of the investigation prior to any interrogation.This bill would specify that a public safety officer under investigation is required to be informed of the time, date, and location of any incident at issue, the internal affairs case number, if any, the title of any alleged violation, and a brief factual summary of any complaint. The bill would also make technical, organization changes. This bill contains other related provisions.

AB 903
(Cunningham R) California Marijuana Tax Fund: California Highway Patrol.
Watch Status: 2/17/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 19.
Location: 2/16/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: (1)Existing law, the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), an initiative statute approved by the voters at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election as Proposition 64, among other things, establishes the California Marijuana Tax Fund as a continuously appropriated fund consisting of specified taxes, interest, penalties, and other amounts imposed by AUMA. AUMA requires, after other specified disbursements are made from the fund, the Controller to disburse the sum of $3,000,000 annually to the Department of the California Highway Patrol beginning fiscal year 2018–2019 until fiscal year 2022–2023, and requires the department to use those funds to establish and adopt protocols to determine whether a driver is operating a vehicle while impaired, including impairment by the use of marijuana or marijuana products, and to establish and adopt protocols setting forth best practices to assist law enforcement agencies.This bill would amend AUMA by requiring the department to use its annual appropriation from the fund to study the viability of standards for marijuana impairment.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 911
(Wood D) Radioactive materials: licensing and registration: exemption.
Watch Status: 3/2/2017-Referred to Com. on HEALTH.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. HEALTH
Calendar: 3/21/2017 1:30 p.m. – State Capitol, Room 4202 ASSEMBLY HEALTH, WOOD, Chair
Summary: Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to establish rules or regulations for general or specific licensing of persons to receive, possess, or transfer radioactive materials, or devices or equipment utilizing these materials. Existing law authorizes the department to require registration and inspection of sources of ionizing radiation, as specified. Existing law authorizes the department to exempt certain sources of ionization radiation or kinds of uses or users from the licensing requirements when the department makes a finding that the exemption of those kinds of users will not constitute a significant risk to the health and safety of the public.This bill would require the department to exempt from the licensing requirement bomb technicians of a bomb squad of specified public entities who have completed the required training and are certified by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation. The bill would require the filing of a written record of current certification of certified bomb technicians employed by those bomb squads. Because the bill would require filing of written records by local agencies, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require the department to exempt from the registration and inspection requirements sources of ionizing radiation operated by the bomb squads of the specified public entities.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 927
(Levine D) Private educational institutions: supplemental law enforcement services: appropriation.
Watch Status: 3/2/2017-Referred to Com. on JUD.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. JUD.
Calendar: 3/21/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 447 ASSEMBLY JUDICIARY, STONE, Chair
Summary: Existing law authorizes the county board of supervisors on behalf of the sheriff, and the legislative body of any city on behalf of the chief of police, to contract to provide supplemental law enforcement services to private schools, private colleges, or private universities on an occasional or ongoing basis. Existing law also requires full reimbursement to the county or city for its actual costs in providing these services. Existing law requires, prior to contracting for these ongoing services to be provided to a private school, private college, or private university, that the board of supervisors or legislative body, as applicable, discuss the contract and the legal requirements of those contracts at a duly noticed public hearing. Existing law also specifies that certain public university and college police departments certified by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training are not prevented from entering into agreements with private schools, private colleges, or private universities to provide law enforcement services.This bill would appropriate $10,000,000 from the General Fund to the Controller for allocation to local governmental entities for the provision of supplemental law enforcement services to private schools, private colleges, or private universities pursuant to the provision described above.

AB 955
(Jones-Sawyer D) Body-worn cameras: peace officers.
Watch Status: 2/17/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 19.
Location: 2/16/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law requires law enforcement agencies, departments, or entities to consider specified best practices regarding the downloading and storage of body-worn camera data when establishing policies and procedures for the implementation and operation of a body-worn camera system, as specified.This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation to establish policies and procedures to address issues related to body-worn cameras.

AB 963
(Gipson D) Taxation: marijuana.
Watch Status: 2/17/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 19.
Location: 2/16/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: (1)The Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), an initiative measure approved as Proposition 64 at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, commencing January 1, 2018, imposes an excise tax on the purchase of marijuana and marijuana products, as defined, and a separate tax on the cultivation of marijuana that enters the commercial market, and requires revenues from those taxes to be deposited into the California Marijuana Tax Fund and allocated for specified purposes pursuant to a specified schedule. AUMA provides for the administration of both taxes by the State Board of Equalization and requires persons required to be licensed involved in the cultivation and retail sale of marijuana or marijuana products to obtain a separate permit from the board. Under AUMA, a violation of provisions relating to these taxes is a crime unless otherwise specified.This bill would provide for the suspension or revocation of those permits, would authorize the board to deny an application for a permit if the applicant had previously been issued a permit that was suspended or revoked, among other reasons, and would set forth the process for appealing permit suspensions, revocations, and application denials. The bill would also impose specific criminal penalties, including fines and imprisonment, for certain violations of the provisions relating to the cultivation and excise taxes on marijuana and would require funds derived from those fines and collected or paid to the board to be deposited into the Marijuana Tax Fines and Penalties Account, which this bill would create in the California Marijuana Tax Fund. By modifying the scope of a crime and imposing new crimes, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 993
(Baker R) Examination of victims of sex crimes.
Support Status: 3/2/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/2/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/21/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law authorizes, the prosecution to apply for an order that a victim’s testimony at the preliminary hearing be video recorded and the video recording preserved when the defendant has been charged with certain sex crimes, including rape and sodomy, and the victim is a person 15 years of age or less or is developmentally disabled as a result of an intellectual disability.This bill would also authorize the prosecution to apply for an order that a victim’s testimony at the preliminary hearing be video recorded and preserved when the defendant has been charged with aggravated sexual assault of a child under 14 years of age or charged with sexual intercourse, sodomy, sexual penetration, or oral copulation with a child under 10 years of age.

AB 1017
(Santiago D) Collective bargaining agreements: arbitration: litigation.
Watch Status: 3/9/2017-Referred to Coms. on P.E., R., & S.S. and JUD.
Location: 3/9/2017-A. P.E.,R. & S.S.
Summary: Existing law, with regard to disputes concerning collective bargaining agreements for private employment, requires a court to award attorney’s fees to a prevailing party in an action to compel arbitration of the disputes unless the other party has raised substantial and credible issues involving complex or significant questions of law or fact regarding whether or not the dispute is arbitrable. Existing law also creates, in this context, a right to attorney’s fees for a prevailing party in a court action to compel compliance with the decision or award of an arbitrator or grievance panel regarding the disputes, or for a prevailing appellee in the appeal of the decision of an arbitrator regarding the disputes, unless the other party or appellant, respectively, has raised substantial issues involving complex or significant questions of law.This bill would apply these provisions to public employment. This bill would also provide that, in connection with an appeal of a decision of an arbitrator, or an action to compel compliance with a decision or award, as described above, in order to avoid an award of attorney’s fees, the appellant or other party must raise credible as well as substantial issues involving complex or significant questions of law.

AB 1024
(Kiley R) Grand juries: peace officers: proceedings.
Oppose Status: 3/6/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/6/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/28/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: Existing law permits a grand jury to inquire into all public offenses committed or triable within the county and present them to the court by indictment. If no indictment is returned, existing law allows the court that impaneled the grand jury to disclose all or part of the testimony of a witness before the grand jury to a defendant and the prosecutor in connection with any pending or subsequent criminal proceeding.This bill would require a court to disclose all or a part of a grand jury proceeding, excluding the grand jury’s private deliberations, if the grand jury does not return an indictment in a grand jury inquiry into an offense that involves a shooting or use of excessive force by a peace officer, as defined, that led to the death of a person being detained or arrested by the peace officer, except as specified.

AB 1029
(Weber D) Comprehensive school safety plans.

Watch Status: 3/6/2017-Referred to Com. on ED.
Location: 3/6/2017-A. ED.
Calendar: 4/5/2017 1:30 p.m. – State Capitol, Room 4202 ASSEMBLY EDUCATION, O’DONNELL, Chair
Summary: Existing law provides that each school district and county office of education is responsible for the development of all comprehensive school safety plans for its schools operating kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 12, inclusive. Existing law requires a schoolsite council or a school safety planning committee comprised of specified members to write and develop a comprehensive school safety plan relevant to the needs and resources of a particular school, and exempts a small school district from this requirement if certain conditions are met. Existing law authorizes a school district or county office of education to elect to have the portions of the plan that include tactical responses to criminal incidents to be developed by the administrators of the school district or county office of education in consultation with law enforcement officials.This bill would instead require comprehensive school safety plans to include those guidelines and strategies and would add community schools among the priorities. The bill would require the State Department of Education to post certain information relating to best practices for community school models, restorative justice programs, and certain other programs on its Internet Web site and to provide technical assistance and professional development to educators and administrators.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 1039
(Quirk-Silva D) Racial and identity profiling: reporting: peace officer.

Watch Status: 3/15/2017-Re-referred to Com. on HUM. S.
Location: 3/6/2017-A. HUM. S.
Summary: Existing law, the Racial and Identity Profiling Act of 2015, requires the Attorney General to establish the Racial and Identity Profiling Advisory Board (RIPA) to eliminate racial and identity profiling and to improve diversity and racial and identity sensitivity in law enforcement. Existing law requires the board, among other duties, to work in partnership with state and local law enforcement agencies to review and analyze racial and identity profiling policies and practices across geographic areas in California.Existing law requires each state and local agency that employs peace officers to annually report to the Attorney General data on all stops, as defined, conducted by the agency’s peace officers for the preceding calendar year. Existing law requires the reporting to include specified information for each stop, including the time, date, and location of the stop; the reason for the stop; the perceived race or ethnicity, gender, and approximate age of the person stopped, provided that the identification of these characteristics be based on the observation and perception of the peace officer making the stop, and the information not be requested from the person stopped; and specified actions taken by the peace officer during the stop. Existing law requires that the data reported be available to the public, except for the badge number or other unique identifying information of the peace officer involved, which is released to the public only to the extent the release is permissible under state law.The California Public Records Act requires a state or local agency, as defined, to make public records available for inspection, subject to certain exceptions. Existing law provides that peace officer or custodial officer personnel records, as defined, and records maintained by any state or local agency relating to complaints against peace officers and custodial officers, or information obtained from those records, are confidential and prohibits the disclosure of those records in any criminal or civil proceeding except by discovery. Existing law describes exceptions to this policy for investigations or proceedings concerning the conduct of peace officers or custodial officers, or an agency or department that employs those officers, conducted by a grand jury, a district attorney’s office, or the Attorney General’s office.This bill would specify that the name or other means of identifying a peace officer in connection with the information that the peace officer collects pursuant to the Racial and Identity Profiling Act of 2015, as described above, is not subject to disclosure under the California Public Records Act. The bill would also state, in related provisions, that nothing in the Racial and Identity Profiling Act of 2015 was or is intended to allow public access to, or disclosure of, that information, as specified. The bill would also make technical, nonsubstantive changes to those provisions.Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.The California Constitution requires local agencies, for the purpose of ensuring public access to the meetings of public bodies and the writings of public officials and agencies, to comply with a statutory enactment that amends or enacts laws relating to public records or open meetings and contains findings demonstrating that the enactment furthers the constitutional requirements relating to this purpose.This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

AB 1116
(Grayson D) Critical Incident Stress Management Services Act.
Watch Status: 3/9/2017-Referred to Coms. on HEALTH and JUD.
Location: 3/9/2017-A. HEALTH
Summary: Under existing law, the California Emergency Services Act, the Governor is authorized to proclaim a state of emergency, as defined, under specified circumstances. The California Emergency Services Act also authorizes the governing body of a city, county, city or county, or an official designated by ordinance adopted by that governing body, to proclaim a local emergency, as defined.This bill would create the Critical Incident Stress Management Services Act. The bill would, for purposes of the act, define a “critical incident stress management team” or “CISM team” as a local crisis response team that is comprised of individuals from law enforcement, fire protection, and emergency medical services, hospital staff, clergy, educators, and mental health providers who have completed a CISM training course established by the Office of Emergency Services. The bill would provide that a communication made by an emergency service provider to a CISM team member while the emergency service provider receives CISM services, as defined, is confidential and shall not be disclosed in a civil, criminal, or administrative proceeding, except as specified. The bill would also provide that, except for an action for medical malpractice, a CISM team or a CISM team member providing CISM services is not liable for damages, as specified, relating to the team’s or team member’s act, error, or omission in performing CISM services, unless the act, error, or omission constitutes wanton, willful, or intentional misconduct.

AB 1192
(Lackey R) Firearms: retired peace officers.
Watch Status: 2/19/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 21.
Location: 2/17/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law defines “honorably retired” for purposes of certain exceptions to the law involving the carrying of firearms by a retired peace officer.This bill would make a technical, nonsubstantive change to this provision.

AB 1199
(Nazarian D) Peace officer training: dogs.
Watch Status: 3/9/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/9/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Existing law requires specified categories of law enforcement officers to meet training standards pursuant to courses of training certified by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST).This bill would require POST to develop and implement training for peace officers regarding encounters with dogs. This bill would also require specified law enforcement officers, including municipal police officers and county sheriff’s deputies, to receive that training. By requiring these officers to perform this training, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 1298
(Santiago D) Public safety officers: procedural rights.

Support Status: 3/13/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/13/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: The Pubic Safety Officers Procedural Bills of Rights requires that certain conditions be met when any public safety officer is under investigation and subjected to interrogation by his or her commanding officer, or any other member of the employing public safety department, that could lead to punitive action. Existing law also governs the admissibility of testimony and evidence in these actions.This bill would require, when any public safety officer is under investigation and subject to interrogation by his or her commanding officer, or any other member of the employing public safety department, on the allegation of making a false statement, that any administrative finding of the false statement shall require proof based on clear and convincing evidence, including corroborating evidence. The bill would also prohibit witness testimony regarding a disciplinary hearing against a public safety officer from being received by telephone or any other electronic means. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 1312
(Gonzalez Fletcher D) Sexual assault victims: rights.
Watch Status: 3/13/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/13/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/28/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: (1)Existing law grants the victim of sexual assault, as specified, the right to have a victim advocate and a support person of the victim’s choosing at any interview by law enforcement authorities, district attorneys, or defense attorneys. Existing law requires the law enforcement authority or district attorney, before commencing the initial interview, to notify a victim that he or she has this right.This bill would require a law enforcement authority or district attorney to also notify the victim that he or she has the right to request to be interviewed by a law enforcement official or district attorney of the same gender or opposite gender, unless one is not reasonably available. The bill would prohibit a law enforcement official from discouraging a victim from receiving a medical evidentiary or physical examination. The bill would require the Department of ______ to develop a document, as specified, that explains the rights of sexual assault victims, including, among other information, a clear statement that the victim is not required to participate in the criminal justice system or to receive a medical evidentiary or physical examination in order to retain his or her rights under law. The bill would require a law enforcement official or medical provider to provide this document to the victim upon the initial interaction. The bill would also require a law enforcement official, upon written request by the victim, to furnish a copy of all law enforcement reports related to the sexual assault, as specified. The bill would require a prosecutor, upon written request by the victim, to provide the defendant’s information on a sex offender registry, if any, to the victim.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 1326
(Cooper D) Theft: aggregate valuation.

Support Status: 3/13/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/13/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/28/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: The Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act (act), enacted as an initiative statute by Proposition 47, as approved by the electors at the November 4, 2014, statewide general election, provided that for a number of theft and theft-related offenses, where the value of the property involved does not exceed $950, the offenses are punishable as a misdemeanor, unless the defendant has suffered a prior conviction for one or more specified crimes, in which case the offenses may be punished as a felony. The act created the offense of shoplifting, and applied the $950 limit to that crime and to the crimes of forgery of certain financial instruments, passing a check or certain other instruments knowing there are insufficient funds for payment of the check or instrument, petty theft, and buying or receiving stolen property, as specified. This bill would additionally provide that those offenses may be punishable as a felony if the property involved in the multiple commission of those offenses within a 12-month period has a value in the aggregate exceeding $950, as specified.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 1339
(Cunningham R) Public employment: background investigations.
Watch Status: 3/13/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/13/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: The California Constitution provides for a right to privacy, and existing statutory law provides certain privacy protections for employment records. Existing law provides that a peace officer must be of good moral character, as determined by a thorough background investigation. Existing law requires, an employer to disclose employment information relating to a current or former employee who is an applicant for a peace officer position, and who is not currently employed as a peace officer, upon request of a law enforcement agency, if certain conditions are met. This bill would require that all applicants for employment within a law enforcement agency be of good moral character, as determined by a thorough background investigation. The bill would extend those employer disclosure requirements to information relating to a current or former employee who is an applicant for a position with a law enforcement agency.

AB 1408
(Calderon D) Crimes: supervised release.
Watch Status: 3/7/2017-Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/6/2017-A. PUB. S.
Calendar: 3/28/2017 9 a.m. – State Capitol, Room 126 ASSEMBLY PUBLIC SAFETY, JONES-SAWYER, Chair
Summary: (1)Existing law requires the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to provide specified information to local law enforcement agencies regarding an inmate released by the department to the agency’s jurisdiction on parole or postrelease community supervision, including a record of the offense for which the inmate was convicted that resulted in parole or postrelease community supervision.This bill would require the department to also provide the local law enforcement agency with copies of the record of supervision during any prior period of parole.(2)Existing law provides the procedure by which the Board of Parole Hearings considers an indeterminately sentenced inmate’s suitability for parole and generally requires a panel of the board, or the board, sitting en banc, to grant parole on the inmate’s minimum eligible parole date unless it determines that the gravity of the current convicted offense or offenses, or the timing and gravity of current or past convicted offense or offenses, is such that consideration of the public safety requires a more lengthy period of incarceration.This bill would require the panel or board, sitting en banc, to consider the entire criminal history of the inmate, including all current or past convicted offenses, in making this determination.(3)Existing law requires the county agency supervising the release of a person on postrelease community supervision to petition a court to revoke, modify, or terminate postrelease community supervision if the agency determines, following application of its assessment processes, that intermediate sanctions are not appropriate.This bill would require the county agency supervising the release of a person on postrelease community supervision to also petition a court to revoke, modify, or terminate postrelease community supervision if the person has violated the terms of his or her release for a third time. The bill would allow a peace officer to arrest a person without warrant who fails to appear at a hearing to revoke, modify, or terminate postrelease community supervision. By imposing additional duties on county agencies administering postrelease community supervision, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.(4)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

AB 1409
(Allen, Travis R) Gang databases.
Watch Status: 3/13/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/13/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Existing law, the California Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act (act) imposes specified punishments for certain crimes committed for the benefit of, at the direction of, or in association with, a criminal street gang, as specified. The act authorizes injunctions against specified gang activity, as provided. The act allows for the keeping of a shared gang database, defined as having various attributes, including, among others, that the database contains personal, identifying information in which a person may be designated as a suspected gang member, associate, or affiliate, or for which entry of a person in the database reflects a designation of that person as a suspected gang member, associate, or affiliate.This bill would require the California Department of Justice to send a copy of all information it has access to pursuant to a shared gang database to the United States Department of Justice.

AB 1428
(Low D) Peace officers: transparency.
Watch Status: 2/19/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 21.
Location: 2/17/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law requires a department or agency that employs peace officers or custodial officers to establish a procedure to investigate complaints by members of the public against those officers. Existing law establishes retention requirements and access privileges, as specified, for those complaints and related reports or findings.This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation on peace officer transparency.

AB 1459
(Quirk-Silva D) Murder: punishment.
Support Status: 3/13/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/13/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Under existing law, a murder perpetrated by specified means or under certain circumstances, is defined as murder of the first degree. All other kinds of murder are of the second degree. Existing law, as added by the Briggs Initiative, a measure approved by the voters at the November 7, 1978, statewide general election, requires that persons convicted of first degree murder be subject to death, life in prison without the possibility of parole, or confinement in the state prison for a term of 25 years to life. Existing law, as approved by the voters as Proposition 67 at the June 7, 1988, statewide primary election, made the 2nd degree murder of a peace officer, as specified, punishable by imprisonment in the state prison for a term of 25 years to life. Existing law, as approved by the voters as Proposition 222 at the June 2, 1998, statewide primary election, made the 2nd degree murder of a peace officer, if specified facts are charged and found true, punishable by imprisonment in the state prison for a term of life without the possibility of parole.This bill would make the murder of a peace officer, as defined, who was killed while engaged in the performance of his or her duties, and if the defendant knew, or reasonably should have known, that the victim was a peace officer engaged in the performance of his or her duties, murder of the first degree. The bill would make a person convicted of this type of murder of the first degree subject to punishment by death or life in prison without the possibility of parole if specified facts are charged and found true.This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

AB 1542
(Dababneh D) Violent felonies: video recording.
Watch Status: 3/16/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/16/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Existing law, as amended by Proposition 21 as approved by the voters at the March 7, 2000, statewide primary election and by Proposition 83 of the November 7, 2006, statewide general election, classifies certain felonies as violent felonies for purposes of various provisions of the Penal Code. Existing law generally imposes an additional one-year term for a felony and a 3-year term for a violent felony for each prior separate prison term served for a felony or a violent felony, respectively. This bill would make it unlawful, in the commission of a violent felony, to willfully record a video, or conspire with another person to record a video, of the commission of the violent felony. The bill would make a violation of this provision punishable by a one-year enhancement, to be served in addition and consecutive to the penalty prescribed for the underlying violent felony. Under existing law, all persons concerned in the commission of a crime, whether they directly commit the act constituting the offense, or aid and abet in its commission, or, not being present, have advised and encouraged its commission, are principals in any crime so committed. This bill would make it unlawful to willfully record a video of the commission of a violent felony pursuant to a conspiracy with the perpetrator of the violent felony to record the video, with the intent to encourage the commission of the underlying violent felony. The bill would make a violation of this provision a felony, punishable by a fine not exceeding $5,000, or by imprisonment for 16 months, or 2 or 3 years, or by both that fine and imprisonment. The bill would authorize the submission of that video by the person recording the video to a law enforcement agency at the first reasonable opportunity to be considered as evidence that the person lacked the intent to encourage the commission of the underlying violent felony. By increasing the penalty for an existing crime and creating a new crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

AB 1548
(Fong R) Occupational safety and health: penalties.
Watch Status: 3/16/2017-Referred to Com. on L. & E.
Location: 3/16/2017-A. L. & E.
Summary: Existing law requires any civil or administrative penalty assessed pursuant to the California Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 against a school district, county board of education, county superintendent of schools, charter school, community college district, California State University, University of California, or joint powers agency performing education functions to be deposited with the Workplace Health and Safety Revolving Fund. Existing law authorizes these entities to apply for a refund of the civil penalties assessed against them if specified conditions are met. Existing law requires moneys in the fund that are not refunded to be expended to assist schools in establishing effective occupational injury and illness prevention programs. This bill would expand the application of this section to public entities, defined as a city, county, city and county, district, public authority, public agency, and any other political subdivision. The bill would state that it is the policy of the State of California that all public employers have and maintain a safe and healthy workplace and that it is the intent of the Legislature that a public entity that has demonstrated a commitment to a safe and healthy workplace, as specified, should be able to seek and obtain a return of the penalty paid by that public entity.

AB 1559
(Garcia, Eduardo D) Community engagement: gun violence prevention: grants.
Support Status: 3/16/2017-Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
Location: 3/16/2017-A. PUB. S.
Summary: Under existing law, the Office of Emergency Services contracts for and regulates specified programs addressing community violence prevention and conflict resolution.This bill would create the Community Engagement and Gun Violence Prevention Grant Program to provide grants to municipal police departments to allow those departments to subscribe to gunshot detection technologies designed to aid law enforcement in responding to and preventing gun violence. The Office of Emergency Services would implement and maintain the grant program, as provided.

AB 1578
(Jones-Sawyer D) Marijuana and cannabis programs: cooperation with federal authorities.
Watch Status: 2/19/2017-From printer. May be heard in committee March 21.
Location: 2/17/2017-A. PRINT
Summary: Existing law, the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MCRSA) provides for the licensure and regulation of medical marijuana, which responsibility is generally divided between the Bureau of Marijuana Control within the Department of Consumer Affairs, the Department of Food and Agriculture, and the State Department of Public Health. The Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA), an initiative measure enacted by the approval of Proposition 64 at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, provides for the licensure and regulation of commercial nonmedical marijuana activities, which responsibility is also generally divided between those same state entities. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to establish and maintain a voluntary program for the issuance of identification cards to qualified patients who have a physician’s recommendation for medical marijuana. Existing law requires the counties to process applications and maintain records for the identification card program. This bill would prohibit a state or local agency, as defined, from taking certain actions without a court order signed by a judge, including using agency money, facilities, property, equipment, or personnel to assist a federal agency to investigate, detain, detect, report, or arrest a person for commercial or noncommercial marijuana or medical cannabis activity that is authorized by law in the State of California and transferring an individual to federal law enforcement authorities for purposes of marijuana enforcement.

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